Recent Visiting Scholars

Fall 2015

Mariela Fuentes Leal
Visiting Fellow
Research Interest: A cognitive approach to reading and teaching the Latin American short story.

Spring 2015

Reinaldo Funes
Henry Hart Rice Family Foundation Visiting Professor
Professor, Department of History, University of Havana, Cuba.
Research Interests: Cuban, Caribbean and Latin America Environmental History, and History of Science and Technology in Cuba.

Teaching: Environmental History of the Caribbean, Graduate seminar (Fall 2015); Environmental History of Latin America, Undergraduate seminar (Spring 2016)
 

Coca-Cola World Fund Faculty Fellow and Senior Lecturer of Latin American Studies

Michael Reed Hurtado  (January – December 2014)
Research Interests:  International human rights and humanitarian law, institutional reform, and the social science of human rights violations.
Teaching: Criminal Law and Mass Atrocity: Beliefs, Promises and Limits

Mariela Fuentes Leal  (2014 - 2015)
Professor of Latin American Literature, Spanish Department, Universidad de Concepción, Chile
Research: Dissertation: En busca del ADN de la escritura, la cultura chileno-ilaniana y de la estirpe in Historia de una sbsolución familiar de Germán Marín

Coca-Cola World Fund Faculty Fellow and Senior Lecturer of Latin American Studies
Michael Reed Hurtado  (January – December 2014)
Research Interests:  International human rights and humanitarian law, institutional reform, and the social science of human rights violations.
Teaching:  Criminal Law and Mass Atrocity: Beliefs, Promises and Limits

Francisco R. Dávila Aldás,  (January – July 2014)
Facultad de Ciencias Politícas y Sociales
Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México
Research:  Why Mexico has failed to finalize the first and second modernization and has had difficulties in transitioning into the third one.

Concepción Delgado Parra  (AY 2013 – 14)
Universidad Autónoma de la Ciudad de México
Research: Cultural identities, otherness and citizenship and their relationship to fragile democracies

Mariela Fuentes Leal  (Spring 2014)
Professor of Latin American Literature, Spanish Department, Universidad de Concepción, Chile
Research:  Dissertation: En busca del ADN de la escritura, la cultura chileno-ilaniana y de la estirpe in Historia de una sbsolución familiar de Germán Marín

Bonnie Palifka  (January – December 2014)
Assistant Professor, Department of Economics, ITESM, Campus Monterrey
Monterrey, N.L., MEXICO
Working with Susan Rose-Ackerman and with the concurrence of Alexandre Debs, co-director of the Leitner Program in Comparative and International Political Economy
Research: Corruption and government.

Sergio Alcides Pereira do Amaral  (February 1 – July 31, 2014)
Professor in Literature at Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Brazil
19th and 20th century Brazilian poetry
Working with K. David Jackson

Ignacio Chuecas Saldias 
Research:  Indian Slavery on the Chilean Frontier XVII-XIX
Working with Stuart Schwartz (History)

Ana Hutz
Ph.D Candidate
Economic History at the History Department, University of São Paulo – USP, São Paulo, Brazil.
Working with Stuart Schwartz

Juliana Bonacorsi de Palma  (February 1 through May 31, 2014)
Ph.D. Candidate in Law, University of Sao Paulo, Brazil
Working with Susan Rose-Ackerman, Henry R Luce Professor Law & Political Science
Research:  Rulemaking in Brazil and the development of the Brazilian administrative process concept

Alejandro Bonvecchi
Visiting Assistant Professor, Program on Democracy and the Initiative on Representative Institutions
Research Interest:  Political Methods and Economic Normalcy in Argentine Fiscal Policymaking during Structural-Reforms
Processes (1983-1999)
Teaching: Economic Policy in Comparative Perspective (Fall 2013)
 
Eddie Camp
Post-Doctoral Associate and Lecturer
Research Interest: Comparative political economy
Teaching: States, Markets, and Rational Individuals (Fall 2013)

Marisol Ruiz
Fox International Fellows in residence at The MacMillan Center (From El Colegio de México, Mexico City)
Masters Candidate, Middle East Studies
The Role of Palestinian Women Citizens of Israel in the Palestinian-Israeli Peace Process
 
Flavio Prol
Fox International Fellows in residence at The MacMillan Center (From the University of São Paulo, Brazil)
Masters Candidate, Law
The Emergence of a New Paradigm for Public Policy? Political Legitimacy, Law and Democracy in a Globalized World

Celeste-Marie Bernier
Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance and Abolition Visiting Fellow
Professor and Chair of African American Studies, University of Nottingham
Research Topic: Slavery and economic growth in Jamaica in the age of Abolition

Ahmed Reid
Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance and Abolition Visiting Fellow
Assistant Professor, Bronx Community College of City University of New York (CUNY)
Research Topic: Slavery and economic growth in Jamaica in the age of Abolition

Coca-Cola World Fund Faculty Fellow and Senior Lecturer of Latin American Studies
Michael Reed Hurtado
January – December 2014
Research Interests:  International human rights and humanitarian law, institutional reform, and the social science of human rights violations.
Teaching:  Criminal Law and Mass Atrocity: Beliefs, Promises and Limits

Francisco R. Dávila Aldás
Academic Year 2013-14
Facultad de Ciencias Politicas y Sociales
Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México
Research:  Why Mexico has failed to finalize the first and second modernization and has had difficulties in transitioning into the third one.

Concepción Delgado Parra
AY 2013 - 14
Universidad Autónoma de la Ciudad de México
Research: Cultural identities, otherness and citizenship and their relationship to fragile democracies

Brian Fried
Lecturer in Political Science and Latin American Studies    Fall 2013
Research: Comparative Politics, Latin American Politics, Political Economy, Methodology
Teaching:  LAST 308 / PLSC, Brazil: Land of the Future?

Ignacio Chuecas Saldias  (History)
Indian Slavery on the Chilean Frontier XVII-XIX

World Fellows – Fall 2013
Enrique Betancourt
Betancourt is co-founder and Executive Director of MESH, an organization that develops tools for bridging the gap between policy design and successful implementation. He is an expert on urban policy and crime and violence prevention and recently served as Executive Director of the National Center for Crime Prevention and Citizen Participation in Mexico. Previously he was Deputy General Director of Social Policy for the Presidency of the Republic of Mexico.
Carlos Vecchio Vecchio is co-founder of “Voluntad Popular,” a Venezuelan social and political movement working to eliminate poverty peacefully and within democracy. He ran campaigns for Venezuelan opposition presidential candidates in 2012.

Program on Democracy and the Initiative on Representative Institutions
Visiting Professors, Postdoctoral Associates and Lecturers
Alejandro Bonvecchi
Visiting Assistant Professor
Research Interest:  Political Methods and Economic Normalcy in Argentine Fiscal Policymaking during Structural-Reforms
Processes (1983-1999)
Teaching: Economic Policy in Comparative Perspective (Fall 2013)
 
Eddie Camp
Post-Doctoral Associate and Lecturer
Research Interest: Comparative political economy
Teaching: States, Markets, and Rational Individuals (Fall 2013)

Fox International Fellows in residence at The MacMillan Center
From El Colegio de México, Mexico City
Marisol Ruiz, marisol.ruiz@yale.edu
Masters Candidate, Middle East Studies
The Role of Palestinian Women Citizens of Israel in the Palestinian-Israeli Peace Process
 
From the University of São Paulo, Brazil
Flavio Prol, flavio.prol@yale.edu
Masters Candidate, Law
The Emergence of a New Paradigm for Public Policy? Political Legitimacy, Law and Democracy in a Globalized World

From the University of Tokyo, Japan
Mayumi Shimizu, mayumi.shimizu@yale.edu
PhD Candidate, Law and Politics
Police for Citizens: Police Work and Violence in Sao Paulo
 
Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance and Abolition
Visiting Fellows
Celeste-Marie Bernier
Professor and Chair of African American Studies, University of Nottingham
Research Topic: Slavery and economic growth in Jamaica in the age of Abolition

Ahmed Reid
Assistant Professor, Bronx Community College of City University of New York (CUNY)
Research Topic: Slavery and economic growth in Jamaica in the age of Abolition
 

2011-2012

Lucas Coffman
Coca-Cola World Fund Visiting Professor, Yale School of Management
Assistant Professor, Department of Economics, Ohio State University
Research Interests: experimental economics, behavioral economics, development economics Brazil
Teaching: One course at the School of Management

Council on Latin American and Iberian Studies Visiting Fellow
Luis Eduardo Zavala DeAlba
Research Professor and Lecture, Director of Human Rights for EGAP, State of Mexico
Research Interest: human rights, human rights policy

Jackson Institute for Global Affairs
Jeremy Seekings (Fall term)
Professor of Political Studies and Sociology, University of Cape Town
Research Interests: South African welfare policy; democratization and the transformation of urban politics in South Africa
Teaching: Comparative Welfare Policy in Developing Countries; Race and Class in Comparative Perspective

Jackson Senior Fellows
Domingo Cavallo
Chairman and CEO of DFC Associates;  Honorary President of Fundación Mediterranea; former Minister of Economy of Argentina
Teaching: International economics

Ana Palacio (fall 2011)
Founding partner Palacio y Asociados; former Minister for Foreign Affairs for Spain
Teaching: Elements of Global Governance: Values & Interests at Crossroads

Fox International Fellows
Laura Stevens Leo
Masters Candidate, International Studies, El Colegio de México, Mexico City
Project Title: Legislative Coalitions in Multiparty Presidentialisms: Comparing Mexico and Brazil  

Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance and Abolition
>Post Doctoral Fellows
Laura Roseanne Adderley (Spring term)
Associate Professor, History, Tulane University
Research Topic: The black experience during the decades around slave trade abolition and slave emancipation in the nineteenth-century Caribbean and the Americas

Yale World Fellows
 Marcelo de Camargo Furtado (Brazil)
Executive Director, Greenpeace Brazil

As the leader of the national chapter of Greenpeace, Furtado is one of Brazil’s most important voices on sustainable development, climate change, and renewable energy. He has nearly 20 years of experience as an activist committed to advancing sustainability and social justice through innovation and public mobilization. Having worked with both Greenpeace Brazil and Greenpeace International since 1990, Furtado has established himself as a visionary and strategic leader with an instinct for mobilizing support on environmental issues from all sectors and constituencies.

2010-2011

Gabriel Aladrén
Ph.D. Student, History
Universidade Federal Fluminense
Dissertation: Entre guerras e fronteiras: escravos, libertos e soldados negros no sul do Brasil (Rio Grande de São Pedro, c. 1801 - c. 1835)
Advisor: Hebe Mattos
Fellowship: Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior (Capes)

Rousiley Celi M. Maia
Associate Professor
Dept. of Communication
Federal University of Minas Gerais
Brazil
“Deliberation, media and political talk,” to be published by Hampton Press, and is a visiting scholar in the Department of Political Science at Yale.

Maria Clara Sales Carneiro Sampaio
 PhD Program in Social History at Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil (USP)
Studying colonization schemes that aimed the settlement of freed African descendents (or in the
process of emancipation) from United States in several countries in Central and South America. These particular colonization projects were proposed to nations such as Mexico, Guatemala, Nicaragua, New Granada (Colombia / Panama), Ecuador and Brazil, among others, by delegates of Washington in the early years of Civil War.

Linda Jewell
Senior Fellow, Jackson Institute for Global Affairs, Spring 2011
Linda Jewell is a career diplomat and senior member of the foreign service who has served in a number of posts all over the world, including Jakarta, Mexico City, New Delhi and Warsaw. She is the former U.S. Ambassador to the Republic of Ecuador. Prior to her post in Ecuador she was Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Mexico and Canada, focusing especially on trade and border issues. She also served as Director of the Office of Policy Planning and Coordination in the Bureau of Western Hemisphere Affairs, the Deputy Chief of Mission at the U.S. Embassy in San Jose, Costa Rica and as Director of the Office of Western Hemisphere Affairs of United States Information Agency.
Courses: INRL 572b/ INTS 261b, US Public Diplomacy in the 21st Century (spring)

2010 Yale World Fellows

Ana Hernández (Mexico)
Co-founder, Collective for an Integrated Drug Policy
A leading human rights advocate in Mexico, Hernández currently promotes drug policy reform that aims for a more balanced approach, integrating scientific evidence and public health perspectives, and emphasizing prevention, treatment, and human rights rather than enforcement and criminalization. She is the former deputy director of the Tlachinollan Human Rights Center in Guerrero, a mostly indigenous region and one of the poorest in Mexico. She has been a consultant to the Angelica Foundation, the Open Society Institute, the Ford Foundation, and the Mexico office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights.

Ricardo Terán (Nicaragua)
Co-Founder & Managing Director, Agora Partnerships
A successful entrepreneur, Terán devotes himself to combating poverty by helping socially responsible small business entrepreneurs start and grow companies that create wealth through job creation and make positive social impacts in their communities. He has also founded three businesses, including international retail clothing franchise LOLITA in Nicaragua and El Salvador and a socially responsible alternative-media company. He a member of the Central America Leadership Initiative, is the co-founder of the Association of Young Entrepreneurs of Nicaragua, and a board member of the Aspen Network of Development Entrepreneurs. Terán is working to make Central America a hub for innovative, entrepreneur-led economic policy and social business models.

2010-2011 Fox International Fellows

>From El Colegio de México, Mexico City

Andrés Hincapié
Masters Candidate, Economics
Project Title: Mixing, Not Fixing, Inequality Theories in Mexico

Pablo Barriga Davalos
Graduating Senior, Political Science
Project Title: The New Left in Bolivia: Indianism, Social Justice and “High Intensity” Democracy
From Free University, Berlin

>From the University of São Paolo, Brazil

Catarina Barbieri
PhD Candidate, Law
Project Title: Resolving the Tort Crisis in Brazil: U.S. and Brazilian Solutions to Contemporary Injury Litigation

From Free University, Berlin

Mr. Georg Fischer
PhD Candidate, Institute for Latin American Studies
Project Title: Strategic Resources and U.S.-Brazilian Technical Cooperation in the 20th Century: The Case of Iron Ore

Jackson Senior Fellows

Linda Jewell
Former U.S. Ambassador to the Republic of Ecuador
Former Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Mexico and Canada
Research Interests: Public diplomacy; Western Hemisphere affairs
Teaching: US Public Diplomacy in the 21st Century

Ethnicity, Race, and Migration Post Doctoral Associates and Lecturers

Lourdes Gutierrez Najera
Assistant Professor, Latin American, Latino & Caribbean Studies and Anthropology, Dartmouth College
Research interest:Zapotec transnational migrations, conflict and belonging
Teaching: The U.S.-Mexico Borderlands   

Gilder Lehrman Center Post Doctoral Fellows

Jane Landers (March 2011)
Associate Professor, Vanderbilt University
Research topic: African Kingdoms, Black Republics, and Free Black Towns in Colonial Spanish America

2009-2010

Coca-Cola World Fund Visiting Professor

Fernando Limongi
(September 2009 – May 2010)
Universidad de São Paulo, Brazil
Teaching: “The Politics of Institutional Choice,” and “Presidentalism and the Comparative Study of Legislatures”

Marcus Melo
(September 1, 2009 - December 31, 2009)
Center for the Study of Public Policy (NEPPU)
Political Science Graduate Program
Federal University of Pernambuco, Recife, Brazil
Teaching: “Comparative Political Economy of Latin America”
Research interests: Controlling governments in Latin America: a comparative analysis of Tribunales de Cuentas and Contralorias. Institutions and governance; constitutional politics; Political economy of reforms (the politics of social security, taxation and budgeting); regulation; comparative federalism, social policy.

Program in Agrarian Studies Fellow

Ponciano del Pino Huaman
Ph.D. in 2008 in Latin American History from the University of Wisconsin and currently a research affiliate at the Instituto de Estudios Peruanos. While at Yale, he will revise several chapters of a book-length manuscript for publication.

Visiting Fellow

Angela Maria Alonso
(September 2009 – May 2010)
Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Filosofia Letras e Ciências Humanas
Research interest: A study of Brazilian abolition within the context of parliamentary positions and negotiations

Lecturer

John Sullivan
Professor of Nahua Language and Culture
Universidad Autónoma de Zacatecas
Director, Zacatecas Institute for Teaching and Research in Ethnology (IDEZ)
Teaching Beginning Nahuatl Language Course through Distance Learning

Research Affiliate

Lidia Santos
Adjunct Professor, Brazilian and Latin American Literature,
The Graduate Center / The City University of New York
Research interest: Brazilian and Latin American Literature

World Fellows

Claudia Lopez (Colombia)
Political Researcher, New Rainbow Corporation and Civil Society Electoral Mission
Columnist, Semana.com
Lopez is a respected journalist and political analyst notable for bringing to light government corruption and politicians’ ties to paramilitary groups.

Maria Machado (Venezuela)
Co-Founder & Chairman, SUMATE
Machado devotes herself to defending democratic institutions and civil liberties through SUMATE, the nation’s leading watchdog for electoral transparency.

Fox International Fellows

To Colegio de Mexico:
Matthew Blomerth, International Relations, Masters Candidate
A House Divided: Exploring Mexico’s Energy Policy Debate

Andrew Konove, History, PhD Candidate
Making Change: Money, Consumption, and Economic Development in Mexico

To Univ of Sao Paolo:
Eileen Zelek, Latin American Studies, 2009
Brazil-China Relations: Development during Post-Cold War Period and a Glimpse into the Future

From Colegio de Mexico:
Pablo Sandoval, History, PhD Candidate
School Teachers, Maoism and Radical Traditions: Politics and Culture in the School Teachers Union of Peru (1972-1992)

From Univ of Sao Paolo:
Gabriela Moraes, International Law, Masters Candidate
Deforestation in the Amazon Forest and the Role of the International Community

2007-2008

RICARDO PEÑARANDA SUPELANO
(Sept-Oct 2007)
Associate Professor, Institute for Political Studies and International Relations
National University of Colombia
Research interest: The political economy of violence in Colombia in historic perspective.

PATRICK BALL
(October 29 – November 9)
Founder, the Human Rights Data Analysis Group, originally a project of the AAAS and presently based at the Benetech Initiative, a non-profit organization in Palo Alto, California.
Research interest:  Truth commissions around the world; human rights documentation

MARCO GARAUDE GIANNOTTI, (Jan-Mar 2008). Professor of Painting- University of São Paulo. Escola de Comunicações e Artes, Departamento de Artes Plásticas, Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil
Research interest:  Contemporary Latin American painting, and reception in the U.S. of Pop Art from Abroad

FRANCISCO GUTIÉRREZ, Professor, Instituto de Estudios Políticos y Relaciones Internacionales, Universidad Nacional de Colombia
Research interest:  Internal conflict, terrorism and crime in Colombia

BEATRIZ MAMIGONIAN, (April 2008). The Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance and Abolition
Professor of History, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Brazil
Research interest: The Impact of the Prohibition of the African Slave Trade to the Legitimacy of Brazilian Slavery in the 19th Century”

Post Graduate Associates:

FABIANA MACHADO, (Brazil). Program on Democracy and Political Science, University of Rochester.
Research interest: Relationship between democracy and inequality

JOSE LEDESMA.  Program on Order, Conflict and Violence, European University Institute
Research interest: Violence and the Spanish Civil War

MARCELO NAZARENO.  Professor of Political Science, Philosophy and Humanity College, National University of Córdoba, Argentina. Program on Democracy
Research interest: Leftist governments and income inequality in Latin America

ALEXANDRA VAZQUEZ, Post Doctoral Associate and Lecturer, Program in Ethnicity, Race and Migration, Theater Studies and Department of American Studies.
Teaching: Latina/o Theater and Performance

2006-2007

Research Affiliate

Agustin Laó-Montes, Assistant Professor, Sociology
Center for Latin American, Caribbean, and Latino Studies, & Afro-American Studies, University of Massachusetts

2005-2006

Visiting Scholars

Canadian Bicentennial Visiting Professor
Max Cameron (Fall 2005)
Visiting Assistant Professor, Canadian Studies Committee and Department of Political Science
Professor, Political Science, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
Teaching: Negotiating NAFTA

Andrew Mellon Visiting Professor of Latin American and Iberian Studies and History
Jean-Frederic Schaub (Fall 2005)
Visiting Professor, Council on Latin American and Iberian Studies and Department of History
Professor, Ecole des Hautes ELtudes en Sciences Socials, Paris, France
Teaching: Iberian Empires; and Barbarism and Civility in Early Modern Western Europe

Lecturers

Natalia Sobrevilla Perea
International Affairs Council
Teaching: The Legacy of Inequality: Race and Ethnicity in the Americas; and Citzenship and the Military in Latin America

Visiting Fellows

José Reginaldo Santos Gonçalves (Spring 2006)
Fulbright/Capes Senior Professor, Council on Latin American and Iberian Studies
Professor, Sociology and Anthropology, Instituto de Filosofia e Ciências Sociais / Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Research interest: Comparative analysis of national identities in Brazil and Portugal

Fernando Martinho (Fall 2005)
Council on Latin American and Iberian Studies
Professor, Department of Romance Literatures, Faculty of Letters of the University of Lisbon, Portugal
Research interest: Influence of American Poetry on Portuguese Post-Pessoan Poetry

Research Affiliates

Jonathan Amith (September 05 – June 06)
Council on Latin American and Iberian Studies
Research interests: Nahuatl

Fabiola Bazo Cameron (Fall 2005)
Council on Latin American and Iberian Studies
Senior Business Officer, Innovation Unit, Western Economic Diversification-British Columbia, Canada
Research interests: Elections in Peru

Catherine Benoit
The Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition
Associate Professor, Anthropology, Connnecticut College
Research interests: Creole Identities

Mary Ann Mahony
Council on Latin American and Iberian Studies
Assistant Professor, Department of History, Central Connecticut State University
Research interest: Society, politics and history in Bahiafs Cacao area, 1850-1937

Cynthia Pope
Latin American Fellow, Council on Latin American and Iberian Studies
Assistant Professor, Department of Geography, Central Connecticut State University
Research interests: Gender, Nationalism, and Security in Cuba

Virginia Santos-Rivero
Council on Latin American and Iberian Studies
Assistant Professor, Department of Romance Languages, Hunter College
Research interest: Juan Ramon JimeLnez and the post-civil war diaspora of Spanish intellectuals in Latin America

Latin American Library Fellow

Juanita Darling, Assistant Professor
Division of Humanities and Communication
California State University, Monterey Bay
Research on origins of Latin American media philosophy through a comparative study of the nineteenth century press.

Fox International Fellows

Iván Cajeme Villarreal Camero
Economics, El Colegio de Mexico, Mexico City, Mexico
Research interests: Demographic Transition and Economic Growth in Mexico

Jose Antonio Hernández Company
International Studies, El Colegio de Mexico, Mexico City, Mexico
Research interest: Interplay Relations and Elecotral Reform in Mexico (1995-2003)

2004-2005

Marilda Aparecida Menezes is a Visiting Fellow at the Program in Agrarian Studies at Yale. Professor Aparecida Menezes is a Professor of Sociology for the Graduate Program at the Federal University of Campina Grande.  She earned her Ph.D. at the University of Manchester, England in 1997 where she completed her Dissertation “Peasant-migrant workers: social networks and practices of resistance”.  Her recent publications include; “Redes e enredos nas trilhas dos migrates: um estudo de famílias de camponeses-migrates (Networks and stories on migrants’ traces: a study of peasant-migrants’ families)”, Rio de Janeiro: Relume Dumará e João Pessoa: EDUFPB, 2002, 249p and “Histórias de migrantes (Migrants’ histories)”, São Paulo: Edições Loyola, 1992, 173 p.

Francisco Arias-Vazquez is a Yale Fox Fellow.  He is a Second year Masters Student of Economics at the El Colegio de Mexico.Arias-Vazquez is researching “Inequality, Democracy and Growth: A Political Economy Approach to Latin-American Countries”

As a Fox Fellow, Mr. Arias-Vazquez’s goal is to gain a better understanding of the sources and solutions to inequality. He will approach the problem by taking into account the role of economic growth and the process of democratization that has taken place in most Latin American countries since the mid-seventies. Using many of the recently developed political economy analytical models Francisco will conduct empirical analysis based on cross-country data of developing countries. He hopes his research will contribute to a better understanding of the sources of inequality and lead to an improved design of programs for poverty alleviation.At Yale, Mr. Arias-Vazquez will make use of the rich library resources, including the Social Science Library, focusing specifically on statistical data from different Latin American countries. He also hopes to consult with Professor Gustav Ranis and Professor John Roemer. Mr. Arias-Vazquez hopes to become a university professor.

Cecilia Barja-Chamas is a Yale World Fellow.  La Paz city councilwoman Cecilia Barja-Chamas, 28, helped found Bolivia’s Movimiento Sin Miedo (MSM) or Movement Without Fear, a new political party devoted to eliminating corruption and addressing the pressing problem of poverty. Her passionate and eloquent advocacy on behalf of the urban poor in Bolivia has propelled her political career. In 2000, she became the youngest person ever elected to the La Paz City Council. As councilwoman, she has served as president of the Commission for Political Development, secretary of the Commission for Institutional Development, Leader of the Ethics Commission and acting mayor. She has also campaigned tirelessly on behalf of the city’s impoverished youth, organizing scholarships and work programs and overseeing the formation of a Municipal Youth Council. Since 2003, Barja-Chamas has also served as national executive secretary for the MSM Party. In rallies and meetings across Bolivia, she speaks forcefully about the need to return power to the local level in Bolivia and, in so doing, give birth to a new generation of honest and forward-looking politicians

Nathalie Gravel is Visiting Fellow at the Council on Latin American and Iberian Studies at Yale. She is an instructor in the Department of Geography at the Université Laval, Quebec, Canada.  Professor Gravel is here at Yale conduction research on “The Mexican Countryside in Economic Transition: a comparative study of rural well-being, 1990-2003”.  The study focuses on both a qualitative and quantitative analysis of well-being perceptions and indicators in two states of two very different regions in Mexico: Yucatan for the south-east and Queretaro for the center. She recently completed her Ph.D. in 2003 from the Université Laval.

Luicy Pedroza is a Graduating Senior of  International Relations at the El Colegio de Mexico and a Fox Fellow at Yale. Pedroza will be researching “The Formation of Democratic Values in Mexico (1990-2003)” Ms. Pedroza’s proposal will analyze the effort to build a democratic political culture in Mexico.  Her research was brought on by her observation that many in Mexico are pessimistic about the possibility of democracy taking root. The central questions she hopes to answer are if it is possible for the government to shorten the gap between the values and attitudes of Mexican society ? Are there attitudes and habits that must be present in society in order for democracy to be stable ? What could be the strategy for strengthening institutions that promote the confidence of citizens in democracy as a process? At Yale, Ms. Pedroza will conduct theoretical research which will serve as a basis to the field research she will go on to carry out in Mexico. Ms. Pedroza will go on to a doctoral program after which she hopes to work in government agencies and/or in NGOs directed toward the strengthening of democracy in Mexico.

Ignacio Sánchez-Cuenca is a Visiting Associate Professor at the International Affairs Council and the Department of Philosophy at Yale.  Professor Sánchez-Cuenca earned his Ph.D. in 1995 from the Universidad Complutense, Madrid in Sociology.  Her is currently an Associate Professor of Political Science at the Center for Advanced Study in the Social Sciences, Instituto Juan March, Madrid and an Associate Professor of Sociology at the Universidad Complutense, Madrid.  He has two forthcoming publications coming out in 2004 entitled; “Party Moderation and Politians’ Ideological Rigidity” Party Politics, 10 (1): 49-66 and “Accounting for the Absence of Suicide Missions”. In Diego Gambetta (ed) Suicide Missions Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Wendy Wolford is a Program Fellow at the Program in Agrarian Studies at Yale. She is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Geography at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.  While at Yale, Wolford will be conducting research on “‘Land for Those Who Work It’: Social Mobilization and the Meaning(s) of Land on Sugarcane Plantations in Northeast Brazil” She earned her Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley in 2001for her work on her Dissertation “This Land is Ours Now: Social Mobilization and the Struggle for Agrarian Reform” Professor Wolford recent publication is; To Inherit the Earth: The Landless Movement and the Struggle for a New Brazil, Oakland, CA, Food First! Publication (with Angus Wright).

Karl Zimmerer is a Program Fellow at the Program in Agrarian Studies at Yale.  Professor Zimmerer is a Professor of Geography at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He is researching “Rural-Urban Distinctions in Landscape Concepts of International Environmental Science, Andean Peasants, and State Rulers”. Professor Zimmerer’s recent publications include; Geographies of Seed Networks and Approaches to Agro biodiversity Conservation. Society & Natural Resources, Volume 16: 583-601, 2003; Political Ecology: An Integrative Approach to Geography and Environment-Development Studies. New York: Guilford Publications; includes “Approaching political ecology: Society, nature, and scale in human-environment studies” (pages 1-25); also “Environmental donation and mountain agriculture” (pages 141-169); “Future directions in political ecology” (pages 275-296) (Ed., with T.J. Bassett), 2003.; “Just Small Potatoes (and Ulluco)? The Use of Seed-Size Variation in ‘Native Commercialized’ Agriculture and Agro biodiversity Conservation among Peruvian Farmers” Agriculture and Human Values 20: 107-123, 2003.

2003-2004

Eva O. Arceo-Gómez is a Fox International Fellow at Yale. She is visiting us from the Center of Economic Studies at El Colegio de México where she is a second year Master’s student. While at Yale she will be conducting research on “Education and Income Distribution in Mexico: An Application of Quantile Regression “. Arceo-Gomez hopes to determine the relationship between income distribution and education in Mexico. Her overall aim is to help devise solutions to Mexico’s social and economic problems and help further the road to economic and social development. She also hopes to extend her project to a cross-country study for Latin America. At Yale, Arceo-Gomez hopes to gather household micro data on Latin American countries, and analyze numerous scholarly journals not easily available in Mexico. She is particularly interested in the work of the Economic Growth Center and the Department of Economics. Arceo-Gomez plans on pursuing a doctoral degree, after which she hopes to work in Mexico’s public sector, in either the Ministry of Social Development or at the Ministry of Education. She also hopes to teach economics.

Isabel Avella Alaminos is a Fox International Fellow at Yale. She is visiting us from the Centre of Historical Studies at El Colegio de México. While at Yale she will be conducting research on “Of Opportunities and Challenges: the Gears of Mexico’s Foreign Trade (1920-1950).” Avella-Alaminos will focus her research on the historical analysis of the qualitative transformations that Mexican foreign trade went through between 1920 and 1950, the period during which the contemporary structure of Mexico’s foreign trade emerged. Her aim is to understand the relationship between the performance of Mexican foreign trade and the domestic and external institutions, organizations and mechanisms which made it possible. Avella-Alaminos believes that understanding the contemporary evolution of Mexican foreign trade is important and relevant for today. At Yale, she will research the library collections on the topics of international relations, economics and global history. She will also audit courses dealing with the interwar period, economic contemporary history and theories related to international trade. Upon her return to Mexico, Avella-Alaminos will continue teaching at the National Autonomous University of Mexico where she is currently a professor of economic theory.

Amy Chazkel is a Visiting Fellow at the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance and Abolition at Yale. Chazkel earned her Ph.D. in Latin American History in December 2002 from Yale. Currently, she is an Assistant Professor of History at City University of New York, Queens College. While at the Gilder Lehrman Center, Chazkel will be conducting research on ” Rethinking the Legacies of Urban Slavery in Brazil: On the Origins of the Informal.”

Malick Ghachem is a Visiting Fellow at the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance and Abolition at Yale. While at Yale, Ghachem will be conducting research on “The Old Regime and the Haitian Revolution: Colonial Variation on a Metropolitan Theme.” Ghachem received his J.D from Harvard Law School in 2002, for his research on “The Law of Slavery, American Constitutional and Legal History.” While at Harvard, he was the recipient of the Charles Hamilton Houston Fellowship in Law Teaching (2002-2003) and the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for Afro-American Research Fellowship (2002). He was also a Teaching Fellow on “The Warren Court and the Pursuit of Justice, 1953-1969 ” at Harvard University in 2002 and a Sources and Methods Instructor on “Slavery in Colonial and Revolutionary America ” at Stanford University in 1999-2000. His recent publications include, “The Slave’s Two Bodies: The Life of an American Legal Fiction “, forthcoming in The William and Mary Quarterly (October, 2003); “Slavery and Citizenship in the Age of the Atlantic Revolutions ” special volume of Historical Reflections, (April/May 2003); “Between Cosmopolitanism and Parochialism: The Vicissitudes of Comparative Law in the United States,” Revista critica del diritto privato 17 (December 1999): 651-667 (trans. Paola Fogliati).

Joaquim Antero Romero Magalhães is a Visiting Professor at the Council on Latin American and Iberian Studies and the Department of History. During Fall 2003, Romero Magalhães will be teaching a graduate course entitled, “History of European Expansion: The Portuguese and Spanish Empires” and an undergraduate course, “Cultural Studies: The Portuguese-speaking world: Literature and History of the Portuguese Expansion.” Romero Magalhães is a Professor of History at the Universidade de Coimbra, Portugal. He is also the former Commissioner General for the National Commemorative Commission on Portuguese Discoveries. He has been a member of the Portuguese Parliament and Secretary of State of Education. In 2001, Romero Magalhães was the recipient of the Medalha de Mérito da Fundação Joaquim Nabuco Recife. His recent publications include, “Le Portugal et les dynamiques de l’économie atlantique du XVe au XVIIIe siècle”, in Arquivos do Centro Cultural Calouste Gulbenkian, vol. XLII, (2001); “As descrições escritas e a identidade do Brasil: séculos XVI-XVIII ” in Revista USP, São Paulo, Março-Maio (2000); The Portuguese in the XVI Century. Areas and Products, Lisboa, CNCDP (1998); “Africans, Indians and Slavery in Portugal ” in Portuguese Studies; “The Strangers Within: Orthodoxy, Dissident, and the Ambiguities of Faith in the Portuguese Renaissance,” The Modern Humanities Research Association, vol. 11 (1995), 12 (1996) and 13 (1997).

Mary Ann Mahony will be a research affiliate at the Council on Latin American and Iberian Studies. Mahony is an Assistant Professor of History at Central Connecticut State University. She received her Ph.D. from Yale University on “The World Cacao Made: Society, Politics, and History in Southern Bahia, Brazil, 1822-1919.” Mahony has previously been an Assistant Professor of History and Political Science at Columbia College (2002-2003) and Assistant Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame (1996-2001). She was a Fulbright Scholar at the Federal University of Bahia, Brazil (2002), a Visiting Fellow at the Council on Latin American and Iberian Studies (2001-2002), a Visiting Scholar at the Department of History at Indiana University (2001). Recently she was a participant at “Roots: African Dimensions of the History and Culture of the Americas”, National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Seminars for College Instructors, Virginia Foundation for the Humanities (2003). In 2002-2003 she served as Chair of the Brazilian Studies Committee of the Conference on Latin American History (2002-2003). Her recent publication include, “ ‘Instrumentos necesarios:’ excravos e excravidão no sul da Bahia do século dezenove” in Afro-Ásia, março (2002); “A Past to Do Justice to the Present: Collective Memory, Historical Representation, and Rule Bahia’s Cacao Area”, in Gilbert M. Joseph, ed., Reclaiming the Political in Latin American History: Essays from the North, Duke University Press, 2001.

Gustavo Vega Cánovas will be a Visiting Professor at the Department of Political Science. Gustavo Vega Cánovas is an expert in U.S.-Mexican economic relations and North American integration, having studied and written extensively on the topic for the past 15 years. He recently published Unfair Trade Practices and Dispute Resolution Mechanisms in Free Trade Agreements of the Americas: The Experience of North America and Chile (2001, in Spanish). He is member of the National System of Researchers (SNI) of Mexico’s Education Ministry. Vega Cánovas has been a visiting professor at several universities, including Yale, Duke, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and the University of Washington at Seattle. He holds both a law degree and a Ph.D. in political science from the National Autonomous University of Mexico and Yale University, respectively.

Akira Watanabe is a Fox International Fellow at Yale. He is visiting us from the Department of Area Studies at the University of Tokyo, Japan, where he is a third year Ph.D. student. While at Yale, Watanabe will be conducting research on ” The Political Linkage Between Center and Periphery: Democratization in Mexico and Local Politics in the Yucatan “. His project is a on the theme of contemporary Mexican politics, specifically on the democratization process. He will examine how the PRI dominated authoritarian political system was transformed into an electoral democracy. As a Fox Fellow, he hopes to combine results from fieldwork he had previously conducted in Mexico, mainly in the Yucatan, between 2000 and 2001, and theoretical studies. At Yale he plans to conduct research in the library’s Latin American Collection and work with, among others, Professors Gilbert Joseph and Ernesto Zedillo. Watanabe hopes to become a teacher and researcher of Mexican and Latin American Politics.

2002-2003

Nelson Andrés Acosta Espinosa is a professor of Anthropology (Venezuela) and Director of the Political Anthropology Unit at the Centro de Estudios de las Américas y el Caribe at the University of Carabobo. While at Yale (September-November 2002), Professor Acosta will be conducting research on a project on the Venezuelan political system. He hopes his research will show how rationalistic discourse shaped the way through which political and cultural reality in Venezuela was thought and transformed. He also hopes his visit will strengthen ties between Yale and his home university. Acosta is working on a forthcoming publication, “Razón y pasión en la cultura política latinoamericana” Cuadernos del CENDES, Caracas, Venezuela.

Jonathan Amith earned his Ph.D. in Anthropology from Yale University in 2000. Amith is a Visiting Research Affiliate at the Council on Latin American and Iberian Studies. He is the founder, coordinator and language instructor of the Yale Náhuatl Summer Language Institute established in 1998. Amith lived for five years in the Náhuatl-speaking communities of Ameyaltepec and San Agustín Oapan, Guerrero, Mexico. His publications include The Amate Tradition: Innovation and Dissent in Mexican Art (1994), “Transitive Nouns and Split Possessive Paradigms in Central Guerrero Náhuatl” (with Thomas Smith-Stark, International Journal of American Linguistics, 1994), “Tan ancha como tu abuela: adivinanzas en Náhuatl del Guerrero central” (Tlalocan, 1998), and “What’s in a word? The whys and what fors of a Nahautl dictionary,” in Dictionaries of Indigenous Languages of the Americas, eds. William Frawley, Kenneth Hill, and Pamela Munro (University of California Press, forthcoming). Amith has worked for over 15 years on a comprehensive dictionary of Ameyaltepec Náhuatl, which is presently being elaborated (along with a reference/pedagogical grammar) with grant support from the International Research and Studies Program of the U.S. Department of Education. He is also presently engaged in a language documentation and literacy program in the Balsas region of Guerrero with support from the Ford Foundation and the Secretaría de Educación Pública, México.

Guillaume Boccara received his Ph.D. in Anthropology from the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales (France) in 1997. He is currently a researcher at the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique-Centre de Recherche sur les Mondes Américans (Paris). He was a Casa Velazquez (Madrid, Spain) fellow from 1995 to 1997, associate researcher at the Instituto de Estudios Indígenas at the Universidad de La Frontera (Temuco, Chile) from 1999 to 2000, and a visiting professor at the Casa de América (Madrid) since 2000. Last year he was a fellow at the Program in Agrarian Studies. This academic year Boccara joins the Department of Anthropology as a Visiting Lecturer. Boccara’s main research interests include the ethnohistory of the Mapuche people of Chile and Argentina and study of Mapuche Shamanism. His research also addresses the processes of ethnogenesis, ethnification, and mestizaje in American Borderlands. Along with publishing numerous articles and essays in France (L’Homme, Etudes Rurales), Spain (Revista de Indias, Anuario de Estudios Americanos), Argentina (Memoria Americana), Chile (Universidad de La Frontera), Brazil (Minas Gerais), and the US (Hispanic American Historical Review), Boccara is the author of Guerre et ethnogenèse mapuche dans Chili colonial (Paris, 1998) and the editor of Lógica Mestiza en América (Chile, 2000) and Colonialismo, Resistencia y Mestizaje en las Américas (Abya Yala-IFEA, 2002).

Beatriz Boza will be affiliated with the World Fellows Program.

Alexander Dawson received a Ph.D. in History from the State University of New York-Stony Brook in 1993 for his dissertation “México Indígenismo and the Paradox of the Nation, 1915-1940”. He has taught at the Departments of History and Philosophy at Montana State University. Professor Dawson is a two-time recipient of the Dunbar Award from the Department of History at Montana State (1999, 2001) and the Scholarship and Creativity Grant for the Advancement of the Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences from Montana State (1999-2000). He has taught courses on “Colonial and Modern Latin America,” “Mexican History,” “Latin American Social History,” “Race in Latin America,” “Gender and Sexuality in Latin America and Politics” and “Political Change in Latin America”. He is currently working on a forthcoming publication Our Noble Race: Remaking the Indian in Post-Revolutionary Mexico, a book manuscript under consideration at the University of Arizona Press. While at Yale he will be completing a project that examines the consolidation of state and society in post-revolutionary Mexico through an analysis of indígenismo, a nationalist viewpoint. His other research project will focus on the recent rise of multiculturalism in Mexico and its relationship to larger international social and political movements.

Enrique Florescano Mayet earned his Ph.D. in History from the University of Paris in 1967 with his research on the maize prices in Mexico, 1708-1813. In 1978 he founded the journal Nexos, which he directed until 1982. Florescano was the General Director of the National Institute of Anthropology and History from 1982 to 1988. Currently he is the Director of Historical Projects of the National Council of Culture and Arts in Mexico. Florescano has published over 100 articles in the field of the social sciences both in Mexico and abroad. His more recent books are Historia de las historias de la nación mexicana (to be published in October, 2002), Para qué estudiar y enseñar la historia (2000), Memoria indígena (1999), and La bandera mexicana: breve historia de su formación y simbolismo (1998). He has received numerous honors and prizes including the National Prize for the Sciences and Arts in History, Social Science and Philosophy by the government of Mexico (1996). While at Yale, Professor Florescano will be teaching a graduate course on Mexican History.

Anupama Mande will be an Associate Research Scholar at the Council on Latin American and Iberian Studies. Dr. Mande’s work focuses on Nicaragua.

Jennifer Martínez is a Visiting Scholar and Senior Research Fellow at the Yale Law School. Professor Martinez received her J.D. in 1997 from Harvard Law School, where she graduated magna cum laude and was awarded the Sears Prize. While at Harvard she was the managing editor of the Harvard Law Review. Following graduation, she served as law clerk to Justice Stephen Breyer of the U.S. Supreme Court, Judge Guido Calabresi of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, and Judge Patricia Wald of the U.N. International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia.

Martinez also received a B.A. in History from Yale in 1993, graduating cum laude and with distinction in the major.

She is a member of the bar in Virginia and Washington, D.C., and served last year as the Vice President for Internal Affairs of the Hispanic Bar Association for D.C. She has served as counsel in recent lawsuits involving international human rights issues, including as counsel for amici curiae in support of the suit by the “comfort women” against Japan for its World War II practices of sexual enslavement. Her primary research interests concern the international legal process, international human rights law and international criminal law. She is currently working on an article about the international judicial system. Recent publications include an article with Judge Patricia Wald, “Provisional Release at the ICTY: A Work in Progress”, in Essays on ICTY Procedure and Evidence 231 (R. May, ed 2001).

Asunción Merino is a visiting fellow in the Department of History. She is a graduate of the Universidad Complutense de Madrid, in Spain. Since her dissertation, her research has been focused, from an historical and sociological perspective, on Contemporary Transatlantic Migration: associationism, migratory networks, exclusionary mechanisms, inclusionary strategies, migratory politics and globalization. She has published the book, Historia de los inmigrantes peruanos en España: Dinamicas de exclusion e inclusion en una Europa Globalizada (Madrid, 2000, CSIC), and the following articles: “Religiosidad e inmigracion, la sociabilidad peruana en Madrid” in the journal Estudios Migratorios (CEMLA, Buenos Aires, 2002), and “Características y usos del habitat entre los inmigrantes de la Comunidad de Madrid” in Migraciones (Universidad Pontificia de Comillas, Madrid, 2002). The Fulbright Commission has supported her two- years research visit to Yale at the Department of History (September 2000–November 2002) where she has been working on Contemporary Spanish migration to Rio de Janeiro (Brazil).

Tanalís Padilla is a recent graduate of the University of California, San Diego, where she earned her Ph.D. in Latin American History. Her dissertation was entitled “From Agraristas to Guerrilleros: The Jaramillista Movement and the Myth of the Pax Priísta”. Padilla is an Assistant Professor of Latin American History at Dartmouth College. She recently published “ ‘Por las buenas no se puede:’ Rubén Jaramillo’s Campaigns for Governor of Morelos, 1946 and 1952” in the Journal of Iberian and Latin American Studies (2001). A Ford Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship will support her research visit to Yale (September 2002-May 2003) where she will be preparing a manuscript on the Jaramillista movement based on her dissertation.

Alonso Pérez-Kakabadse (Ph.D., Candidate, The Graduate Institute of International Studies, Geneva)

Alonso Pérez-Kakabadse is visiting Yale through the World Fellows Program and the Council on Latin America and Iberian Studies. Since 2000 Pérez-Kakabadse has been the Economic Advisor to Ecuadorian President Gustavo Noboa Bejarano. He has played a pivotal role in the stabilization and recovery of his country’s economy during the early 2000s. He is a Ph.D. candidate in Economics at the Graduate Institute of International Studies (Geneva). Pérez-Kakabadse has also served as Vice-Minister of the Economy at the Ecuadorian Ministry of the Economy and Finance where he helped lead Ecuador through its recent financial crisis by enacting a program to adopt the dollarization regime, a complex and ultimately successful endeavor, to slow inflation and achieve economic stability. He has taught at the Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Ecuador, Quito.

Patricia de Santana Pinho Chagas earned her Ph.D. in Social Sciences from the Institute of Philosophy and Human Sciences, State University of Campinas in 2001. She comes to Yale after concluding her Ph.D. dissertation on Brazilian representations of blackness, analyzing how black identity narratives are engendered within the established order of power. Pinho teaches in private universities in Brazil and is also a volunteer at Brazilian local NGOs supporting dispossessed groups. This will be Pinho’s second visit to Yale. In 2001 she was a Visiting Affiliate Scholar with the Department of African-American Studies, working with Professor Paul Gilroy (Sociology). This academic year, Pinho has been named the Rice Family Foundation Visiting Lecturer and will be teaching two courses: Introduction to Afro-Brazilian Culture (Fall 2002) and Discussing Blackness in Brazil (Spring 2003).

Miguel Ramírez (Ph.D. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) is Professor of Economics at Trinity College as well as a Yale visiting professor. His research and publications focuses on international economics and Latin America. He has taught various seminars in the economics program at Yale for the past decade. He is a native of Chile and a naturalized U.S. citizen since 1990. He received his Ph. D. in economics from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1984. His teaching interests are primarily in the areas of Latin American economic development and international finance. As far as his research is concerned, it is primarily dedicated to analyzing the challenges and opportunities that Latin American nations face as they attempt to stabilize and reform their economies. In particular, his work has reviewed and analyzed the impact of adjustment and stabilization measures in Chile and Mexico, as well as the mixed success of structural reform programs such as privatization of state-owned firms, deregulation of economic activity, and liberalization of trade and finance. While at Yale he wil be teaching Econ 476a Topics in International Economics.

Guadalupe Rodríguez Gómez will be affiliated to the Program on Agrarian Studies.

Daniel Rothenberg is currently a Senior Fellow at the Orville H. Schell, Jr. Center for International Human Rights at Yale Law School and a Fellow in the Agrarian Studies Program at Yale University. More recently, he was at the University of Michigan, where he was an Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology, a Fellow in the Michigan Society of Fellows and a Visiting Professor at the Law School. He received his Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of Chicago and is the author of With These Hands: The Hidden World of Migrant Farmworkers New York: Harcourt Brace 1998 (revised paperback edition, University of California Press, 2000). His research concerns transitional justice, genocide, truth commissions, globalization and labor migration.

Amílcar Sandoval, 28, advisor in strategic planning and federalism and former Undersecretary of International Relations for the Party of the Democratic Revolution (PRD) in Mexico. He is presently one of the inaugural members of the Yale World Fellows Program and is working to shape the party’s policies on federalist reform and international relations. Under his guidance, the PRD is forming alliances with parties in other countries and developing new foundations for Mexico’s foreign policy. Prior to his international role, he served in Congress as Chief of the Economic Staff in the Federalism Commission and advisor to the Speaker of the House. He has authored articles on transition to democracy in Mexico and during his time at Yale he will focus his research on the functioning of systems of fiscal federalism throughout the Americas.

Neide Silva will be affiliated with the World Fellows Program.

2001-2002

Guillaume Boccara
For further information, please see Visiting Scholars, 2002-2003.

Noemí Goldman received her Ph.D. in History from the Université de la Sorbonne, in 1984. She currently is Professor of History at the Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Buenos Aires and Researcher at the National Council for Scientific Research (CONICET). She is associated with the Instituto de Historia Argentina y Americana “Dr. Emilio Ravignani” where she is a member of the Editorial Board of Boletín de Historia Argentina y Americana “Dr. Emilio Ravignani”, a major academic periodical in the field. She was a Visiting Professor at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Science Sociales, (France) and at the Universitat de Barcelona. Professor Goldman main research interests include 19th Century Argentine history and discourse analysis and political culture in Latin America. She has been affiliated with the International Society for Intellectual History since 1998. She was also an Associate Foreign member of the Inter-University Center for Discourse Analysis and Text Sociocriticism (CIADEST), Montreal, Canada, until its discontinuation in 1997. Among many other seminars an international conferences, Professor Goldman has recently participated in “Liberalism in the Revolution of Hispanic-American Independence”, a colloquium organized by Liberty Fund (Buenos Aires). Professor Goldman is the author of: El discurso como objeto de la Historia (1984); Historia y Lenguaje. Los discursos de la Revolución de Mayo (1992; 2nd revised edition 2000); Caudillismos Rioplantenses. Nuevas miradas a un viejo problema, co-edited with Ricardo Salvatore (1998), and editor of Revolución, República, Confederación 1806-1852, volume three of the collection Nueva Historia Argentina (1998). Her numerous scholarly papers were published in both Argentine and foreign academic reviews. Professor Goldman’s research at Yale is funded by the Rene Hugo Thalmann program of the Universidad de Buenos Aires.

Juan Gonzalez Mendoza earned his Ph.D. in History from the State University New York at Stony Brook in 1989. Currently he is an Associate Professor of History at the Universidad Interamericana de Puerto Rico, San Germán Campus. Professor Gonzalez is also the Executive Secretary of the Caribbean Historians Association and Past President of the Association of Puerto Rican Historians. While at Yale University, he will be a Senior Fellow at the Gilder Lehrman Center on Slavery and Abolition at the Yale Center for International and Area Studies, from March to May 2002. The focus of his study while at Yale University, will be the dilemma that Cuban and Puerto Rican elite have faced at an earlier period, regarding the desirability and dangers of increasing slave imports as means of insuring their respective island progress. He has embarked on the study of how Puerto Rico Creole patriots imagined the future of their homeland during the turbulent period that followed the French and Haitian Revolutions, the metropolitan and colonial struggle for independence, and the alternation of absolutism and liberalism in Spain that followed the end of the Napoleonic wars.

Mary Ann Mahony
For further information, please see Visiting Scholars, 2003-2004

Elizabeth Olgesby will be affiliated to the Program in Agrarian Studies.

Miguel D. Ramírez
For further information, please see Visiting Scholars, 2002-2003.

Daniel Rothenberg
For further information, please see Visiting Scholars, 2002-2003.

Valter Sinder will be joining the Department of Anthropology for the 2001-2002 academic school year as the Rice Family Foundation Visiting Lecturer. He is an Associate Professor of Social Sciences at the Instituto de Filosofia e Ciencias Humanas Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro. Professor Sinder received his Ph.D. from the Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro in 1992. His work was dedicated to the Theory of Literature, with a focus on the narrative and historical aspects. Since completing his Ph.D. he has published several papers and has lectured courses focused on the narrative and its relationship to identity building. He also participated in the Pensamento Social Brasileiro (Brazilian Social Thought) group of ANPOCS (the Brazilian Post-Graduate Association in Social Sciences), where he also presented a number of papers surrounding the idea of human and social sciences and reflections on Brazil and the problems that the country has been facing as it tries to identify itself as a modern nation. Professor Sinder will be offering two courses at Yale: Brazilian Readings: Identity and Fragmentation and Social and Anthropological Thought in Brazil.

2000-2001

Adolfo Gilly received his Ph.D. in Political Science (Latin American Studies) from the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) in 1994. He is currently a Full Professor in the School of Graduate Studies, Department of Political and Social Sciences at the UNAM, in Mexico, and has held this position since 1979. He was chief advisor to the Office of Mexico City’s Mayor from 1997 to 2000, and has taught undergraduate and graduate courses at the University of Chicago, Columbia University, the University of Maryland, and Stanford University. He has also held fellowships from the Social Science Research Council, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation and the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, and he has been a research fellow twice at the National Humanities Center. His main research interest is social movements and revolutions in Latin America, and some of his books, such as Inside the Cuban Revolution (1964), The Mexican Revolution (1971), and The Guerrilla Movement in Guatemala (1965), and La nueva Nicaragua (1981), have been translated from Spanish to English, French, Portuguese and Japanese. One of his later books, El cardenismo: Una utopía mexicana (1994) is considered the most comprehensive analysis of one of Latin America’s leading revolutionary nationalist, Lázaro Cárdenas, and his latest book on Chiapas, Chiapas and the Rebellion of the Enchanted World, was translated in 1998 in Daniel Nugent’s Rural Revolt in Mexico. Professor Gilly was a visiting professor at Yale University in Fall 2000.

Heinz Sonntag received his Ph.D. in Social Sciences from the University of Bochum, Germany, in 1967. He is currently Full Professor of Sociology at the Faculty of Economic and Social Sciences of the Central University of Venezuela and Senior Researcher at the Center for Development Studies (CENDES) of the Central University of Venezuela, whose director he was from 1983 until 1997. He has been Guggenheim Fellow from 1999 to 2000 and for the same time visiting Professor (Research) at the Thomas Watson Institute for the International Relations at Brown University and Visiting Scholar at Boston College. He is affiliated to the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies at Harvard University. Professor Sonntag’s main research interests include the sociology of state and social change, the sociology of collective actors and of social exclusion, as well as public policies in the economic and social fields. His research also addresses the history of political and social ideas, and strategic planning. His fluency in multiple languages, including Spanish, German, English, and French, as well as his active participation in the international academic community, have allowed him to present congresses and seminars across the globe. He was president of the Latin American Sociological Association (ALAS) between 1993 and 1995. Along with publishing numerous articles and essays, Sonntag is the author of Social Knowledge: Heritage, Challenges, Perspectives — Sociology in Latin America (1998), Venezuela 4-F: Un análisis sociopolítico (1992), Nuevos temas, nuevos contenidos? Dudeza-certeza-crisis: Las ciencias sociales de América Latina (1989), among many other books and monographs. Professor Sonntag was a visiting professor at Yale University during the 2000-2001 academic year.

Francisco Zapata received his Ph.D. from the University of Paris in 1970, and is currently Professor-Researcher at El Colegio de México, Mexico City, where he has held this position since 1974. He directed the Center for Sociological Studies of this institution from 1994 to 2000, and has been a member of the Mexican Academy of Sciences since 1991. He has also been a member of the National System of Researchers since 1984. Professor Zapata has received multiple honors and recognition, including the Edward Larocque Tinker Chair in Latin American Studies at the University of Texas at Austin in 1982. He held the position of Visiting Professor at the Institut d’tudes d’merique Latine of the University of Paris in 1983-1984 and again in 1991, and was President of the American Association of the Sociology of Work from 1993 to 1996. In the period from 1974 to 1999 Zapata has taught graduate seminars and courses in Ph.D. and M.A. programs at El Colegio de México, the Latin American Faculty of Social Sciences in Mexico and Brazil, at the University of Paris, the University of Texas at Austin, and other Mexican institutions. Furthermore, he has published seven books, compiled four collective books, and written numerous articles and chapters in professional journals. During Fall 2000 he taught an undergraduate course on “Ideology and Politics in Latin America” and one graduate seminar on “Labor Process, Conflict and Worker Consciousness”; in the former he will consider the way in which ideological discourse shapes political action in Latin America, and in the latter he will address the labor conflicts and processes in which miners and industrial workers are engaged, and through which they develop their working consciousness.