Council on Latin American and Iberian Studies

Working Groups

Caribbean Studies Working Group  |  Latin American History Speaker Series  |  Latin American Studies Working Group  |  Race and Slavery in the Atlantic World Working Group

Caribbean Studies Working Group

See message below from working group leaders, René J. Kooiker and Ciru Wainaina

We plan to take this year as an occasion to read recent scholarly works and take stock of the exciting developments in our field around the interdisciplinary study of sound, media, viscerality, and the senses more broadly. Our readings this year will probe, in the words of Neetu Khanna, the “relations between embodied experience and political feeling,” as well as the ingrained reflexes, habits, and “phenomenological figures” of (de)colonization and race.

More inspiration comes from Toni Morrison: we also hope to explore what she called liquidity, the ways in which artists of different media, like her fiction and the painting of Romare Bearden, “fold into, energize, and transfer the aesthetics of one another.” Such liquidity exists in scholarly practices as well, and we hope to invite young scholars to comment on their experimental methods. See below for a preliminary schedule of readings (subject to change). For the first session, Ciru and I will introduce the group and hold brief presentations on our themes for the semester (if you have a chance to look at the readings, please do so, but we know it’s short notice).

The group will also be a supportive and diverse audience for those who want to present work in progress on the themes of our group. If you wish to present, please write to us (rene.kooiker@yale.edu and ciru.wainaina@yale.edu) in the next two weeks. There is no need to send in a paper or even a precise idea for the presentation at this time, but it will help us to plan the semester. We will try to have the presentations during the regular working group hours, but we will also try to work around that if necessary. What seems to have worked best in the past year is to have a pre-circulated paper with a brief introductory presentation by the author, followed by an open discussion.

09/08

Khanna, Neetu. Introduction & Coda: Explosion. The Visceral Logics of Decolonization.

Opal Palmer Adisa, Caribbean Passion, Peepal Tree Press, 2004. Available online through Yale Libraries (https://hdl.handle.net/2027/mdp.39015060113407)

09/22

Campt, Tina. Introduction. Listening to Images: An Exercise in Counterintuition

Caribbean Queer Visualities: A Small Axe Project Statement and Portfolio I in Small Axe Volume 19, Number 1 (46)

10/6

Goffe, Tao Leigh. “Sugarwork: The Gastropoetics of Afro-Asia After the Plantation.” Asian Diasporic Visual Cultures and the Americas 5, nos. 1–2 (2019): 31–56. doi: 10.1163/23523085-00501003.

Zavala, Adriana. “Blackness Distilled, Sugar and Rum: María Magdalena Campos-Pons’s Alchemy of the Soul, Elixir for the Spirits.” Latin American and Latinx Visual Culture 1, no. 2 (2019): 8–32. doi: 10.1525/lavc.2019.120003.

10/20

Thompson, Krista. Shine

The Visual Economy of Light in African Diasporic Aesthetic Practice, chapter 3: “Shine, Shimmer, and Splendor: African Diasporic Aesthetics and the Art of Being Seen in the Bahamas”

11/3

Vanessa Agard-Jones, Where Trauma Resides / Bodies in the System

11/17

Ellis Neyra, Ren. The Cry of the Senses: Listening to Latinx and Caribbean Poetics. Duke University Press, 2020.

12/1

Juanita Brown, Kimberly. The Repeating Body: Slavery’s Visual Resonance in the Contemporary

Please reach out to Rene and Ciru directly if you are interested in attending these meetings.

Latin American History Speaker Series

Yale Graduate & Professional School students are invited to join the Latin American Studies Working Group (LASWG) meetings, which will take place via Zoom this semester on Mondays from 12pm to 1pm ET. Papers will be circulated one week before each meeting along with a Zoom link, and the sessions will be dedicated to sharing feedback. Please RSVP to yale.laswg@gmail.com to receive the paper and link.

September 7: Josh Mentanko, ”Plants into Pills: Indigenous Plants, the World Health Organization, and Research into Fertility Regulation across the Global North and South in the 1970s”

September 21: Cristian Padilla Romero, Prospectus Draft (a study of modern Central America)

September 28: Radha Sarkar, Dissertation Excerpt (“When Pentecostal Politics Represents Women”)

October 5: Patrick Barker, Dissertation Excerpt (a study of enslaved politics and resistance strategies in Trinidad de Barlovento, 1760s-1830s)

October 12: Emilie Egger, Dissertation Excerpt (a study of reproductive politics in modern Peru)

November 9: Javier Porras Madero, “Hegemony at the Margins: Nationalism, Mapping, and State Formation Along the Guatemala-Mexico Border in 1970”

December 7: Corey Herrmann, Dissertation Excerpt (coastal Ecuadorian archaeology)

You are invited to join the Latin American Studies Working Group (LASWG) meetings.which will take place via Zoom this semester on Mondays from 12pm to 1pm ET. Papers will be circulated one week before each meeting along with a Zoom link, and the sessions will be dedicated to sharing feedback. Please RSVP to yale.laswg@gmail.com to receive the paper and link.

Fall 2020 LASWG meetings:

September 21: Cristian Padilla Romero, Prospectus Draft (a study of modern Central America)

September 28: Radha Sarkar, Dissertation Excerpt (“When Pentecostal Politics Represents Women”)

October 5: Patrick Barker, Dissertation Excerpt (a study of enslaved politics and resistance strategies in Trinidad de Barlovento, 1760s-1830s)

October 12: Emilie Egger, Dissertation Excerpt (a study of reproductive politics in modern Peru)

November 9: Javier Porras Madero, “Hegemony at the Margins: Nationalism, Mapping, and State Formation Along the Guatemala-Mexico Border in 1970”

December 7: Corey Herrmann, Dissertation Excerpt (coastal Ecuadorian archaeology)

Race and Slavery in the Atlantic World is a working group designed to give faculty and graduate students a forum to present work-in-progress related to Atlantic World slavery. 
 
The working group is open to those interested in slavery and related subjects in North America, Latin America and the Caribbean, Europe and Africa before 1900. We aim to give participants an opportunity to present book or dissertation chapters, articles-in-progress, or prospectus drafts. Topics include but are not limited to the relationship between slavery and: the state, society, politics, empire, political economy, agriculture, gender, resistance and revolt, abolition, emancipation, and cultural and racial formations. 

We meet on Wednesdays from 6-7:30pm, via Zoom. Workshop format is a pre-circulated paper with a moderated discussion. Please contact us to be added to the working group email list. Pre-circulated papers and the Zoom login are only distributed to the group email list. To be added, contact: Teanu Reid at teanu.reid@yale.edu.

Fall 2020 Race and Slavery in the Atlantic Working Group meetings:

  • September 30:  Philippe Halbert, History of Art, Yale University
  • October 28: Kathleen Monteith, History, University of the West Indies, Mona, Jamaica
  • December 2: Bianca Dang, African American Studies and History, Yale University